Chemistry

Degrees and Certificates

The Department of Chemistry at Villanova University offers masters and bachelors degrees, including an American Chemical Society accredited degree program for undergraduates.  Our faculty actively conduct research in diverse areas such as environmental chemistry, protein biochemistry, fuel cell research, and computational chemistry. We recognize that undergraduate research provides a unique opportunity to work closely alongside a faculty mentor, gaining an experience that extends far beyond typical classroom learning, and we encourage all undergraduates to participate in undergraduate research.

Classes

CHM 1000 : Profesl Development Sem

These courses taken by all chemistry majors each semester with presentations on the chemical profession by students, faculty and visiting chemical professionals. A broad range of activities will include presentations on undergraduate research, career planning, the chemical industry, chemical safety and such topics as medicinal chemistry, polymer chemistry, pharmacology, etc.

Credits

1

CHM 1103 : General Chemistry Lab I

Qualitative and quantitative laboratory experiments which include: the reactions of metals with water; the collection and plotting of data; acid-base titrations; oxidation-reduction titrations; the use of the pH meter and the determination of acid-base titration curves; the use of the spectrophotometer.

Credits

1

Corequisites

CHM 1131 or CHM 1151

CHM 1104 : General Chemistry Lab II

Students will be required to identify all metal ions present in an unknown solution. Quantitative titrations of sodium carbonate and the total hardness of water. Synthesis of inorganic compounds and determination of the formula of a transition metal complex ion using spectroscopic methods.

Credits

1

Corequisites

CHM 1152 or CHM 1156 (Note: Engineering students are waived from this lab.)

CHM 1107 : General Chemistry Lab: Nursing

Qualitative and quantitative laboratory experiments which include: chemical identification testing, molecular modeling, coordination compound synthesis, reaction kinetics and equilibrium, acid-base titrations, and gas laws.

Credits

1

Corequisites

CHM 1131.

CHM 1108 : General Chemistry Lab II

Chemistry of organic and biochemical compounds with an emphasis on the identification and chemical reactivities of functional groups. Students will be required to separate and identify various organic and biochemical compounds. Open to health affiliation students.

Credits

1

CHM 1131 : General Chemistry I

Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry: atomic theory, chemical bonding, chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium, gases, liquids, solids, solutions, stoichiometry, acid-base theories, electrochemical concepts, and an introduction to nuclear chemistry will be included. Open to health affiliation students.

Credits

3

CHM 1134 : General Chemistry II

Introduction to organic and biochemistry stressing the application of principles developed in CHM 1131. Open to health affiliation students.

Credits

3

CHM 1151 : General Chemistry I

Basic concepts of chemistry covering the following topics: stoichiometry, redox reactions; properties of gases; thermochemistry; descriptive presentation of atomic orbitals; molecular structure and bonding; chemical trends in the periodic table; properties of bulk matter; colligative properties of solutions.

Credits

4

CHM 1152 : General Chemistry II

Continuation of CHM 1151. Introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium; the chemistry of acids and bases; buffers and titrations; complex ions and solubility; factors that drive chemical reactions; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry.

Credits

4

CHM 1156 : General Chemistry II for Egr

Continuation of CHM 1151. Introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium; the chemistry of acids and bases; buffers and titrations; complex ions and solubility; factors that drive chemical reactions; electrochemistry; introduction to organic chemistry.

Credits

4

CHM 1301 : Inorganic Chemistry Lab I

Selected experiments to illustrate fundamental laboratory techniques and skills. Qualitative and quantitative measurements, synthesis and characterization of inorganic complexes, literature searching and computer usage. Emphasis on modern research applications of metals and main group elements.

Credits

2

CHM 1311 : Inorganic Chemistry I

Fundamental principles in inorganic chemistry stressing relationships among structure, bonding, and reactivity. Properties of matter, periodic trends, acid/base reactions, redox reactions, and bonding in transition metal complexes.

Credits

3

CHM 1502 : Quant Anal Lab

Laboratory experiments to complement CHM 1512 covering the following: gravimetric analysis, acid-base titrations (weak acid; mixed acid), compleximetric titration and redox reactions.

Credits

2

CHM 1512 : Quantitative Analysis

Chemical analysis, with emphasis upon statistical methods, acid-base properties, pH, equilibrium expressions, complexation equilibria, solubility properties, redox potentials, electrolysis, and electrochemical cells.

Credits

3

CHM 2201 : Organic Chemistry Lab I

Practical experience in techniques used for separation, purification, and isolation of synthetic as well as naturally occurring organic compounds. Semi-micro and micro scale experiments. Crystallization, distillation, extraction, and chromatography are introduced.

Credits

1

CHM 2202 : Organic Chemistry Lab II

Further training in laboratory techniques used in organic chemistry, including those introduced in CHM 2201, and utilization of such techniques in representative types of organic reactions. Semi-micro and micro scale experiments.

Credits

1

CHM 2211 : Organic Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry stressing the relation of structure and reactivity. Structure and bonding; stereochemistry; acids, and bases; electrophilic addition, elimination and nucleophilic substitution.

Credits

3

CHM 2212 : Organic Chemistry II

Continuation of CHM 2211. Carbonyl group reactions, aromatic chemistry, spectroscopy and special topics such as heterocycles, carbohydrates and nucleosides, amino acids and proteins, lipids, radicals, rearrangements, polymers and photochemistry.

Credits

3

CHM 3201 : Organic Chemistry Lab I

Provides practical experience in the principal techniques utilized for the purification, separation, identification, and synthesis of organic compounds on the micro scale. Open to Chemistry majors.

Credits

2

CHM 3202 : Organic Chemistry Lab II

The semi-micro techniques include distillation, recrystallization, extraction, sublimation, and chromatography. Synthesis of representative organic compounds. An introduction to research in organic chemistry, introduction to qualitative organic analysis and practical use of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies.

Credits

2

CHM 3211 : Organic Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry stressing the relation of structure and reactivity from a physical-chemical viewpoint. Structure and bonding; stereochemistry; acids and bases; electrophilic addition reactions of alkenes, alkynes, and dienes; nucleophilic substitution reactions at saturated carbon atoms and elimination reactions leading to alkenes or alkynes. Open to chemistry majors.

Credits

3

CHM 3212 : Organic Chemistry II

Addition and substitution reactions of carbonyl compounds, electrophilic and nucleophilic aromatic substitutions, radical and concerted reactions, heterocyclic compounds and polymer chemistry. Spectroscopic methods of analysis including nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopies and mass spectrometry. Introduction to multi-step organic synthesis. Open to chemistry majors.

Credits

3

CHM 3301 : Inorganic Chem Lab II

This laboratory course emphasizes preparative techniques of inorganic compounds. Instrumental methods of structure elucidation are included.

Credits

2

CHM 3311 : Inorganic Chem II

The second course in the sequence on principles of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on bonding, structure and reactivity. Application of these principles to problems in acid-base, coordination, organometallic, bioinorganic and materials chemistry.

Credits

3

CHM 3402 : Physical Chem Lab II

Experimental methods of chemical kinetics will be covered. Spectroscopic, polarimetric, and conductimetric methods will be used.

Credits

1

CHM 3404 : Physical Chemistry Lab I

Experiments centered on chemical rate processes and spectroscopy including NMR relaxation, classical rate studies, infrared spectroscopy, as well as computer simulation of experiments.

Credits

2

CHM 3405 : Physical Chemistry Lab II

Experiments centered on chemical thermodynamics including calorimetry and phase equilibria, emphasizing data treatment, including error analysis curve fitting, and related topics.

Credits

2

CHM 3412 : Quantum Chemistry

This course will present an introduction to quantum mechanics and its implications including molecular orbital theory, electronic structure, and molecular spectroscopy.

Credits

3

CHM 3413 : Molecular Thermodynamics

First, second, and third laws of thermodynamics; phase equilibria and chemical equilibria; gases; and electrochemistry will be covered in this course.

Credits

3

Corequisites

CHM 3401 or CHM 3405.

CHM 3416 : Physical Chem for Engineers

Chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and the structure and properties of materials, including atomic structure, solid and liquid state chemistry, surface and colloid chemistry, and transport properties.

Credits

3

CHM 3417 : Biophysical Chemistry

A study of thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilbria, and spectroscopy as they apply to biological molecules, macromolecules, and cells.

Credits

3

CHM 3501 : Instrumental Analysis Lab

Laboratory techniques to obtain quantitative information about the composition of unknown samples, including potentiometric titration, spectrophotometry, chromatography, kinetic analysis, anodic stipping voltammetry, spectrofluorometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. Designed to complement CHM 3511 lecture.

Credits

2

CHM 3503 : Bioanalytical Chem Lab

Laboratory course to complement CHM. 3514; emphasis on the analysis of biological systems utilizing modern analytical techniques. Designed for the biochemistry concentration.

Credits

1

CHM 3511 : Instrumental Analysis

The utilization of instruments covering the following topics: analog and digital signals, absorption and emission of light by molecules and atoms, chromatography (HPLC, GC) and detection, use of enzymes and antibodies, radioactivity, and chemometrics.

Credits

3

CHM 3514 : Bioanalytical Chemistry

Designed for the biochemistry concentration with emphasis on theory, instrumentation and practical applications of analytical chemistry to biological materials.

Credits

3

CHM 4222 : Organic Struct Analysis

The currently most useful spectroscopic methods for the structural determination of molecular systems, including: NMR (2D and 2D), mass spectrometry, infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopies.

Credits

3

CHM 4224 : Spec Top: Medicinal Chemistry

History and fundamentals of modern Medicinal Chemistry and drug discovery. Drug targets, drug-target relationships: (agonists/antagonists, inhibitors/activators, modulators), structure activity relationships, on- versus off-target relationships, physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, bioisosteres, structure- and property-based design. A previous Biochemistry class is suggested but not required.

Credits

3

CHM 4229 : Organic Reactions & Synthesis

Survey of organic reactions with emphasis on modern synthetic methods and their applications to the synthesis of complex organic compounds. Enolates, carbonyl condensation reactions, functional group interconversions, electrophilic addition reactions, reductions, organometallic reagents, concerted reations, oxidations. Synthetic strategies including retrosynthetic analysis in the context of specific examples of multi-step synthesis from recent literature.

Credits

3

CHM 4292 : Advanced Organic Chemistry

An expanded presentation of fundamental topics in organic chemistry: structure, bonding, stereochemistry, molecular orbital theory, reactive intermediates and reaction mechanisms.

Credits

3

CHM 4315 : Organometallics

Examination of the bonding, spectroscopic properties and reactivity of a range of ligands and compleses. Reaction mechanisms and catalytic cycles will be emphasized.

Credits

3

CHM 4325 : Introductory Polymer Chemistry

Topics include: step- and chain- polymerizations, copolymerizations, molecular weight determination, polymer morphology, polymer testing and characterization, and current advances in polymer chemistry.

Credits

3

CHM 4331 : Bioinorganic Chemistry

The roles metal ions play in biological systems are explored using relevant examples from natural systems and areas of current research including (but not limited to): catalysis, photosynthesis, respiration, biomimetic modeling, and solar energy conversion.

Credits

3

CHM 4413 : Spectroscopy & Structure

Use of the fundamental principles of atomic and molecular structure to study ultraviolet, infrared, microwave and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Continuous-wave and Fourier transform methods will be included along with fluorescence, phosphorescence and laser spectroscopic techniques.

Credits

3

CHM 4441 : Colloidal&interfacial Science

Basic physicochemical principles of colloids and interfaces such as adhesion, capillarity, interfacial and solution thermodynamics as well as theories of colloidal stability (electrical double layer, zeta potential, DLVO theory), and Light scattering methods.

Credits

3

CHM 4447 : Computational Chemistry

Focus on basic theories behind popular computational models (e.g., molecular mechanics, density functional theory) and their application to chemical problems.

Credits

3

CHM 4517 : Environmental Chemistry

Apply key concepts in chemistry to global scales by examining chemical systems within Earth's lithosphere hydrosphere and atmosphere. Examine and discuss natural processes as well as anthropogenic impacts like climate change and environmental contamination using central scientific literature.

Credits

3

CHM 4601 : Survey Biochemistry Lab

An introduction to laboratory techniques in biochemistry; enzyme kinetics, column chromatography, electrophoresis, standard biochemical assays and interpretation of data.

Credits

1

CHM 4603 : Biochem Tech. and Pract.

A laboratory course to complement CHM 4621 with emphasis on enzyme purification, enzyme characterization, and nucleic acid analysis.

Credits

1

CHM 4604 : Biochem Tech. and Pract II

A continuation of the introduction of fundamental biochemistry laboratory techniques, along with the application of skills acquired in CHM 4603.

Credits

1

CHM 4610 : Principles of Biochemistry

A terminal, one semester biochemistry course for the physical sciences and engineers; the kinetics and thermodynamics of biochemical systems and associated molecules, including proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates.

Credits

3

CHM 4611 : Survey of Biochemistry

A terminal, one semester survey of biochemistry; carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, vitamins & hormones; consideration of their utilization & metabolism in living systems.

Credits

3

CHM 4621 : Biochemistry I: Structure

An in-depth study of the structure and function of the structure and function of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids.

Credits

3

CHM 4622 : Biochemistry II: Metabolism

A study of the metabolism of biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides, including the integration, regulation and control of intermediary metabolism. Emphasized are the hormonal regulation of pathways and metabolic disease.

Credits

3

CHM 4623 : Biochemistry III

Integration of metabolism in organisms, membrane receptors expression of genes, gene manipulation, translation, transcription.

Credits

3

CHM 4633 : Biochemical Parasitology

Brief overview of parasitology, the unique biochemistry associated with parasites, discussions of relevant therapeutic applications. The parasites responsible for malaria, toxoplasmosis, trichomoniasis, giardiasis, and African Sleeping Sickness will be studied. The biochemistry of host parasite interaction will also be explored.

Credits

3

CHM 4641 : Chemical & Biochemical Imaging

The course provides a survey of recent microscopy advances that push the boundaries of image resolution. Instruments and techniques that probe the inner workings of the cell at the level of individual molecules will be discussed, including confocal, TIRF, quantum dots, AFM, and PALM.

Credits

3

CHM 4652 : Biochemical Basis of Disease

A study of the relationship between protein structure and disease, enzymes as therapeutic targets, peptide hormones and obesity, and glucose metabolism and cancer.

Credits

3

CHM 4663 : Bioinformatics

This course focuses on bioinformatic approaches to studying protein function, structure, and evolution. Other topics will be discussed; for example, genomics and gene expression.

Credits

3

CHM 4664 : Signal Transduction

Overview of signal transduction and the biochemistry of receptors and other cell sensors, with an emphasis on oxygen, reactive oxygen species, inflammation, and disease. Current literature will be used, in addition to the textbook.

Credits

3

CHM 4665 : Enzymes

Structural and mechanistic aspects of enzymes. Topics include chemical catalysis, steady state and pre-steady state kinetics, mechanisms, and biological relevance of specific enzyme systems.

Credits

3

CHM 4800 : Research

Student participation in independent research under faculty supervision, frequent conferences with advisor on literature search, theoretical and experimental research.

Credits

0

CHM 4801 : Research I

Student participation in independent research under faculty supervision, frequent conferences with advisor on literature search, theoretical and experimental research.

Credits

3

CHM 4851 : Thesis Research I

Directed research with a Chemistry or Biochemistry faculty mentor that culminates in a written thesis and seminar presentation. Part I of a two-semester sequence with CHM4852. A written interim report is required at the end of the semester.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of participating faculty member required.

CHM 4852 : Thesis Research II

Continuation of CHM4851 - Thesis Research I. Directed research with a Chemistry or Biochemistry faculty mentor that culminates in a written thesis and seminar presentation.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of participating faculty member required.