English

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ENG 1050 : The Literary Experience

Introduction to literature and the methods of literary analysis. Close readings of texts. Individual sections vary in the works covered.

Credits

3

ENG 1842 : Perspectives in Literature

Close readings of literary texts, examined from particular thematic perspectives. Individual sections vary in the works covered. Does not fulfill Core Curriculum requirements. Preference given to freshman students.

Credits

3

ENG 1975 : Core Lit and Writing Seminar

Careful reading of and intensive writing about literature. Individual sections vary in themes and works covered. Restricted to Arts & Sciences students governed by the New Core Curriculum instituted in Fall 2011.

Credits

3

ENG 2003 : Intro to Creative Writing

Designed for students who wish to experiment with composing several kinds of creative writing: short fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry.

Credits

3

ENG 2004 : Intro to Creative Nonfiction

Creative nonfiction has been described as "true stories well told." Students will write, close read, and workshop "true stories," including travel writing, food writing, and the lyric essay.

Credits

3

ENG 2006 : The Writing of Poetry

Instruction in poetry writing, including how to craft imagery, figurative language, sound, line, and rhythm, as well as traditional and contemporary forms. Students read widely and write lyric, narrative and experimental poems that are shared in a supportive workshop setting.

Credits

3

ENG 2007 : The Writing of Screenplays

Instruction in writing screenplays. Limited to 15 students. Permission of instructor required.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor required.

ENG 2009 : Writing the Traditional Novel

A creative writing workshop course designed for students eager to leap into the complex process of writing a novella or short novel. Students will close-read short novels to analyze elements of craft and workshop sections of their own novel in-progress.

Credits

3

ENG 2011 : Writing the Experimental Novel

Reading of a variety of experimental fictional models and application of these models to the construction of a larger experimental group novel, thus expanding students' repertoire of narrative techniques.

Credits

3

ENG 2012 : Advanced Creative Writing

Usually taught by visiting professors. For writers of poetry and short fiction. Reading of models of exemplary technique and application of these to students' own work. Critical feedback from peers and professors.

Credits

3

ENG 2013 : Writing of Memoir

Through readings of seminal essays and memoirs and writing assignments that emphasize voice, structure, research, dialogue and the reconstruction of events, students learn to shape personal experiences into compelling narratives.

Credits

3

ENG 2016 : Writing Speculative Fiction

This creative writing workshop explores craft elements of writing short- and long-form fiction. Reading and writing assignments focus on speculative fiction, including the genres of horror, fantansy, science fiction and historical fiction.

Credits

3

ENG 2017 : Writing Detective Fiction

Do you love detective fiction? Have you always wanted to write your own "whodunit?" In this course, you'll read and analyze classic and contemporary detective fiction while working to produce, workshop, and polish your own creative work.

Credits

3

ENG 2018 : Nature Writing Workshop

The natural world will be a source for the creative non-fiction, poetry, and fiction pieces students will write in this class. Through readings, field trips, writing exercises, and workshops students will learn to sharpen their language and see more deeply.

Credits

3

ENG 2020 : Journalism

News gathering and news writing; principles, rules and techniques of news, editorials, features.

Credits

3

ENG 2030 : Tutoring Writers

Theory and practice of Writing Center Work; writing, editing and tutoring skills. Permission of instructor required.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of instructor required.

ENG 2041 : Travel Writing

Writing of travel narratives with focus on descriptive and narrative techniques. Readings in contemporary travel tales as well as critical theory associated with travel writing.

Credits

3

ENG 2042 : Web Writing Theory & Practice

Design and completion of web writing projects and web sites. Theoretical and critical attention to the different rhetorical situations of print and hypertext media.

Credits

3

ENG 2043 : Writing About US Pop Culture

Analysis of popular culture: TV, advertising, the visual arts, music, the Internet, sports, and best-selling books. Extensive writing for individual student web pages.

Credits

3

ENG 2046 : English as a 2nd Language

This service-learning course provides students with the background, tools, and experience needed to teach English to non-native speakers. In addition to classes at Villanova, students practice teaching at a Hispanic culture center.

Credits

3

ENG 2050 : Writing for Magazines

The craft of magazine writing. Genres of non-fiction including profile writing, essay writing, travel writing, criticism, and long-form journalism.

Credits

3

ENG 2051 : Sports Writing

Sports are more than games; they're a crucible for examining human experience. By examining the work of some of the genre's best writers, students will learn to report and write about this arena with deeper understanding and thought.

Credits

3

ENG 2060 : Desktop Publishing

Use of software to write editorials, news articles, and press releases, and to design flyers, brochures, and newsletters for community organizations. The basics of web page design.

Credits

3

ENG 2103 : Amer Literary Trad 1

American literature from the Colonial Period to the era of Walt Whitman and other writers whose lives and works largely precede the Civil War.

Credits

3

ENG 2300 : Women in Literature

Study of the place of women in literature, with emphasis on modern fiction, drama and poetry written in English.

Credits

3

ENG 2302 : Apocalyptic Literature

One of the oldest forms of narrative, apocalyptic literature is more popular - and powerful - than ever. Starting with Revelation, this course traces this tradition through fascinating poems, stories, novellas, novels and films to the present day.

Credits

3

ENG 2304 : Cont World Lit & Environment

The study of global contemporary fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and film that focuses on the environment, climate change, social justice and the future of nature.

Credits

3

ENG 2350 : Narrative Television

Plot, character, voice, point of view in visual, aural, dramatic, and verbal aspects of serial television. What works similiarly or differently in television and prose fiction? In television and film?

Credits

3

ENG 2360 : Adaptation:Film as Literature

The relationship between movies and literature dates back to film's earliest days. Comparing films and texts allows for an explanation of storytelling and the fascinating choices auteurs make. Plot, tone, and symbolism are considered alongside questions of power and representation.

Credits

3

ENG 2400 : Western World Literature I

Readings in translation of some of the classics of Western literature from the ancient world to the Renaissance, by such writers as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, and Cervantes.

Credits

3

ENG 2410 : The Art of Translation

Translation is a passport to the world. Explore texts translated from a range of languages into English. Translation theory and experiments in translation will support our reading and writing across boundaries. Fluency in a second language is not required.

Credits

3

ENG 2610 : Tutorial Readings

Program of approved readings under the supervision of a selected faculty member; examination on readings and a lengthy paper required. Restricted to senior English majors with high cumulative averages. Permission of chair required; ordinarily may not be repeated.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of chair required; ordinarily may not be repeated.

ENG 2800 : Teaching Practicum

Open only to senior English majors with a GPA of at least 3.5. Permission of consulting teacher and chair required.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of consulting teacher and chair required.

ENG 2998 : Publishing Co-op

Full-time employment with a selected firm in the area of publishing, where experience is gained through appropriate training, instruction, and supervision. Approval of English Department Chair required.

Credits

6

Prerequisites

Approval of English Department Chair required.

ENG 2999 : Publishing Co-op

Full-time employment with a selected firm in the area of publishing, where experience is gained through appropriate training, instruction, and supervision. Approval of English Department Chair required.

Credits

9

Prerequisites

Approval of English Department Chair required.

ENG 3150 : Chaucer

The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and additional works.

Credits

3

ENG 3160 : Fabulous Middle Ages

The Middle Ages mixed history (historia) and fable (fabula) freely. This course traces the intersections between the fablous (the fictional and fantastic) and the "real" in medieval narratives about the history, global travel, and the natural world.

Credits

3

ENG 3260 : Revenge Tragedy

This course studies a popular and influential type of Renaissance drama: the revenge tragedy, a genre preoccupied with spectacular acts of murder and revenge and with the psychological, social, familial, and political circumstances that motivate and justify violent revenge.

Credits

3

ENG 3300 : 17th Cent Poetry & Prose

The poetry of Donne, Jonson, Lanyer, Herrick, Herbert; essays, sermons, journals, letters, pamphlets of Bacon, Donne, Milton, and others.

Credits

3

ENG 3350 : Milton

English poems and selected prose on issues of gender, politics, religion, culture.

Credits

3

ENG 3440 : Harlots, Rakes, & Libertines

Discover the Libertine authors of the seventeenth and eighteenth century, whose witty, scandalous works promoted a freethinking philosophy of sexual pleasure and individual freedom, and provoked critics who blamed them for modern social problems such as prostitution, proverty, and crime.

Credits

3

ENG 3504 : 19th Cent Brit Women Writers

Writings by important nineteenth-century British women novelists and poets, including Mary Shelley, Charlotte Bronte, Christina Rossetti, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and others.

Credits

3

ENG 3530 : Victorian Doubles

Investigate how Victorian literature represents doubles - self and other, women and men, past and present, public and private - and study changing constructions of gender, industrialization, and imperial expansion in nineteenth-century Britain.

Credits

3

ENG 3580 : Topics in 19th C Irish Lit&Cul

Special topic in 19th century Irish literature and culture. For access to the full course description, go to this course number in the Villanova Master Schedule and click on the "syllabus available" link.

Credits

3

ENG 3610 : Modern British Poetry

British poetry from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on Hopkins, Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Muir, Edith Sitwell, K3 Dylan Thomas, and Philip Larkin.

Credits

3

ENG 3615 : James Joyce

A study of the novels and short stories of James Joyce, with concentration on Ulysses.

Credits

3

ENG 3616 : Irish American Drama & Film

Depictions of the American Irish in popular drams and films from colonial times to the present. Popular Irish- American actors and their appeal, the Irish-American musical stage tradition, and the cross-over from popular drama to popular films such as John Ford's The Quiet Man and The Informer.

Credits

3

ENG 3621 : Contemp British Novel

This course explores British fiction written after the second World War until today. What stories do novelists tell about the meaning of "Britishness" after the British empire? We investigate themes of nostalgia, xenophobia, feminism, and class warfare in stylistically varied novels.

Credits

3

ENG 3680 : Top: 20th-21st C Irish Lit&Cul

Special topic in 20th-21st century Irish literature and culture. For access to the full course description, go to this course number on the Villanova Master Schedule and click on "syllabus available" link.

Credits

3

ENG 4003 : African-American Lit Trad 1

Black people helped craft the narrative of their lived experiences from their arrival in the New World. Students read the earliest African American literary offerings through the first decade of the twentieth century, including political treatise, autobiography, poetry and novels.

Credits

3

ENG 4500 : American Slave Narrative

Slavery as a central paradox of American history and literature with emphasis on race and gender. Readings by Douglass, Brent, Stowe, Morrison, and others.

Credits

3

ENG 4505 : Concord Writers

The major works of and interactions between Concord's most celebrated writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bronson and Louisa May Alcott.

Credits

3

ENG 4605 : Amer Poetry: 1900-1950

American poets of the first half of the twentieth Century, including Robinson, Frost, Stevens, Cummings, Williams, Millay, Pound, Eliot, and others.

Credits

3

ENG 4622 : African American Women Writers

From Phyllis Wheatley to Zora Neale Hurston, Lorraine Hansberry to Alice Walker, Toni Morrison to Chimamanda Adichie, black women writers have helped shape and complicate the contours of the American literary canon. Students read an exciting range of genres.

Credits

3

ENG 4640 : Contemp Amer Women's Lit

Writings by women from WW II to the present. Works by Ann Petry, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Joyce Carol Oates, Kathy Acker, Bobby Ann Mason, and others.

Credits

3

ENG 4645 : Post Modern Amer Fiction

Experimental narratives by American writers of the last four decades. Works by Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Don DeLillo, Joanna Russ, and others.

Credits

3

ENG 4646 : Race & Ethnicity: Amer Novel

Canonical texts that treat questions of race and ethnicity. Focus on the critical role of language and literature in constructing and deconstructing racial categories.

Credits

3

ENG 4647 : Gender & Sexuality in US Lit

This course examines a facinating range of contemporary US literary texts to explore the ways that gender and sexuality intersect with race, class and other categories of identity to form our experiences of selfhood, community, national belonging, and power.

Credits

3

ENG 4648 : U.S. Empire & Cont. Am. Lit.

Examines American literature in the context of U.S. empire, including histories and effects of settler colonialism, overseas expansion, and war. Focuses on authors of color from 1945 to the present.

Credits

3

ENG 4649 : Intro to Asian American Lit

Examines literature, film art, and other cultural productions by Asian Americans and explores Asian American histories from the early 20th century to the present.

Credits

3

ENG 4651 : Lives of the Undocumented

The lived experiences of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. told in their own words through memoir, fiction, poetry, graphic novel, testimony, creative and critical essays.

Credits

3

ENG 4652 : Letters, Texts, & Twitter

How does writing bring together distant lovers, friends, family? We'll read letters, the digital forms (social media, instant messaging) that have replaced them, and their representation in novels, poems, and essays to explore how intimacy forms across distance.

Credits

3

ENG 4700 : Caribbean Literature

Explores representations of the culture and history of the Caribbean in the literary and performance traditions of creative artists from the region. Examines postcolonial discourse and folklore aesthetics across genres and in cultural forms such as carnival and Carbbean music.

Credits

3

ENG 5000 : Senior Seminar

Capstone experience combining immersion in primary and secondard materials with an intensive writing experience. Limit of 15 students.

Credits

3