Humanities

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

HUM 1975 : Epiphanies of Beauty

Exploration of literary arts as illuminating human condition and mystery of creation through several genres: novel, novella, drama, poetry, short story. T.S. Eliot, Claudel, G.M. Hopkins, J. Joyce, Flannery O'Connor, R.L. Stevenson, O. Wilde.

Credits

3

HUM 2001 : THL:God

What is religion, anyway? Do we need it anymore? What is the place of religion in the contemporary world? How revelation might illuminate God and creation in a way that transforms the world? Fulfills an upper level Theology in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 2002 : Human Person

What is human nature, human destiny? How does one become more deeply human? What does it mean to act for the human good? How can we discover meaning in primordial human experiences such as love, mortality, finitude, and suffering?

Credits

3

HUM 2003 : PHI:World

Modern science is a dominant way of interpreting the world, and so human life. How does modern science interpret the world? What are the effects of this interpretation on the way we view human beings? Fulfills an upper level Philosophy in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 2004 : PSC:Society

Political, economic, and family life dominate our concerns and yet we seem cynical about possibly finding meaning in them. How is our dependent, rational nature developed through marriage, family, work, markets, and government? Fulfills an upper level Political Science in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 2100 : HIS:The Goods & the Good Life

Explore issues in economic life through texts in theology, philosophy, history, anthropology, literature, and arts. Why do we work, what is the difference between work and toil? What does the production and consumption of things tell about the human person, world, and God?

Credits

3

HUM 2200 : HIS: Literature & Politics

How has literature affected political life and imagination? If writers can write about politics, should they enter politics and become acknowledged legislators? Students will read fiction and non-fiction. The focus will be on the political intelligence of literature. Fulfills an upper level History in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 2500 : HIS:Imperialism & Humanities

What have been the meanings of empire for imperialist and imperialized? How can different humanities complement, enrich, and contradict each other? Theme pursued through literature, history, philosophy, theology, art, music and film. Fulfills an upper level History in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 2950 : Vocation and Purpose

Reflection on Villanova college experience in guided seminar discussion and workshops designed to envision and shape post-graduate career and life paths. Restriction: Instructor Permission

Credits

1

HUM 2996 : Internship

Humanities majors must satisfy all requirements set by the Internship Office. Students must submit a 10-15 page essay to the Humanities Chair copying the Internship Office. See department web page for particulars.

Credits

6

HUM 3001 : ENG:Lewis Tolkien & Inklings

Explores the fictional, theological, and philosophic writing of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and the Inklings (Charles Williams, Dorothy L. Sayers, G.K. Chesterton, George MacDonald). Investigates the relationship between fantastic "otherwordly" fiction and human "wordly" experience. Fulfills an upper level Literature in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 3150 : PHI: Beauty & Human Existence

Significance of beauty for human life. Is beauty "subjective"? Students consider contemporary thinkers on art, culture, and survey philosophies of art and beauty from ancient to modern. Fulfills an upper level Philosophy in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 3170 : The Nature of Human Freedom

History of philosophy texts discussing meaning of freedom, (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Spinoza, Leibriz, Schiller, Schelling). Relationship of intellect and will, freedom and the good, free choice and determinism, and autonomy and respect for others.

Credits

3

HUM 3180 : PHI: Faith & Reason

Reflects on classical and contemporary texts dealing with relation between faith and reason. Discusses imaginative presentations of the christian worldview attempting to show how it's both reasonable and mysterious. Fulfills an upper level Philosophy in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 3200 : PSC: Politics & Human Nature

Our conception of human nature arises in part from our practice of politics and vice versa. What is the relationship between the way we think about the nature and meaning of human life and the practice of politics? Fulfills an upper level Political Science in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 3600 : Amer Architecture since 1865

Survey of architecture and town planning in the United States from 1865 to present. Themes of American exceptionalism, emergence of modern design, and continuity of traditional architecture. Major figures include Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry.

Credits

3

HUM 3700 : Political Thought of Rousseau

Understandings of the human person in Locke and Rousseau, and their consequences for political order, citizenship and education -- agreements and disagreements that almost define the terms of controversy in the modern view of humanity.

Credits

3

HUM 4000 : Jews,Christians,Muslims:Dialog

An overview of the context of radical pluralism within which contemporary discourse occurs. An examination of the challenges of this situation, an observation of Aquinas' interaction with other thinkers, and a proposal for this medieval model for inter-religious inquiry.

Credits

3

HUM 4200 : Forgiveness:Pers & Pol

This seminar mimes recent discussions that address these crucial questions: Does forgiveness abrogate justice? What is the place of anger and hate? May we forgive persons who will not repent? Is forgiveness a duty? Can forgiveness resolve political disputes and racial tensions?

Credits

3

HUM 4350 : PHI: Problem of Love

Reading a broad survey of philosophical discussions of love, from Plato to Derrida, we will address a variety of questions concerning the nature of love, the relationship between self-interest, self-love, and love of other, whether Christianity makes a difference to the meaning of love, and related issues. Fulfills an upper level Philosophy in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 5110 : HIS: Utopia

Oscar Wilde once said that any map of the world that does not include Utopia is not even worth glancing at. Students will study the maps of Utopia drawn up by a variety of writers from antiquity to the present. Fulfills an upper level History in the Core Curriculum.

Credits

3

HUM 5150 : Literature & Politics

Exploration of the relationship between literature and politics through novels, poetry, theater, and journalism. Authors: Orwell, Conrad, Zola, Wilde, Silone, Baldwin, and others.

Credits

3

HUM 5950 : Citizenship & Globalization

Examination of the sweep of British History since 1327, with special attention to four periods: Medieval England; Early-Modern London and Reformation, Renaissance, and Revolution; Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Britain and the growth of Empire; and Post-Colonial United Kingdom and the European Union. Consideration given to English Music, Art and Architecture, Literature, and Political Theory. To take place partly in London.

Credits

3

HUM 5975 : Pellegrinaggio: Augustine

Learn more about the life and works of St. Augustine of Hippo. Examination of the life and writings of St. Augustine in preparation for the pilgrimage to Italy, and on-site exploration of Augustine's historical context and legacy.

Credits

3

HUM 6000 : Great Thought Seminar

Focused engagement with great text, great thinker, great idea in the intellectual tradition. Examples include: Brothers Karamazov, Plato's Republic, Wordsworth, Frank Lloyd Wright, John Ruskin, Thomas Aquinas. Course explores basic human questions as illuminated by the thinker or text. Restriction: Must have completed 2 Gateway courses.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HUM 2001 or HUM 2002 or HUM 2003 or HUM 2004

HUM 6500 : Senior Seminar

The department's capstone is a seminar, meeting once a week, in which students read contemporary texts on issues they have engaged in their study of the humanities.

Credits

3